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FINRA Disciplinary Action Against Royal Alliance Associates, Inc; FSC Securities Corporation; SagePoint Financial, Inc.; and Woodbury Financial Services, Inc.

On July 24, 2018, FINRA announced that the firms submitted Letters of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent in which Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. was censured and fined $350,000; FSC Securities Corporation was censured and fined $200,000; SagePoint Financial, Inc was censured and fined $200,000.; and Woodbury Financial Services, Inc. was censured and fined $250,000.  Without admitting or denying the allegations, the firms consented to the sanctions and to the entry of findings that during the investigation period the firms failed to establish, maintain and enforce a supervisory system and written procedures designed to reasonably supervise representatives’ sale of multi-share class variable annuities and failed to provide training to their representatives and principals on the sale and supervision of these annuities.   Additionally, Royal Alliance failed to reasonably supervise variable annuity exchanges in that it failed to implement a reasonable supervisory system and procedures to regulate its registered representatives.

According to the findings, the firms’ procedures did not specifically address suitability issues related to the different surrender periods, fees and costs of the different variable annuity share classes; as well as, it did not specifically address the suitability concerns raised by the sale of an L-share contract when combined with a long-term income rider.  The investigation also found that the firms failed to provide adequate training to their registered representatives and reviewing principals to ensure that they understood the material features of variable annuities.   The firms’ training was not designed to ensure that their representatives and reviewing principals understood all suitability considerations.

The investigation revealed that between February 2014 and December 2015, Royal Alliance received over $61.9 million from the sale of variable annuities.  More than 28% of the annuities were L-share contracts.  Between January 2013 and December 2014, FSC received over $51.5 million from the sale of variable annuities; SagePoint received over $52.7 million from the sale of variable annuities; including $11.5 million from the sale of L-share contracts, and Woodbury received over $107.1 million from the sale of variable annuities, including approximately $18.8 million from the sale of L-share contracts.

Questions or comments may be addressed to David A. Weintraub, P.A. 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone: 954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

SEC Charges New York-Based Firm and Supervisors for Failing to Supervise Brokers Who Defrauded Customers

On June 29, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced that it had charged New York-based broker-dealer Alexander Capital L.P. and two of its managers for failing to supervise three brokers who made unsuitable recommendations to investors, “churned” accounts, and made unauthorized trades that resulted in substantial losses to the firm’s customers while generating large commissions for the brokers.

Their report found that Alexander Capital failed to reasonably supervise William C. Gennity, Rocco Roveccio, and Laurence M. Torres, brokers who were previously charged with fraud in September 2017.  According to the order, Alexander Capital lacked reasonable supervisory policies and procedures and systems to implement them, and if these systems were in place, Alexander Capital likely would have prevented and detected the brokers’ wrongdoing.

In separate orders, the SEC found that supervisors Philip A. Noto II and Barry T. Eisenberg ignored red flags indicating excessive trading and failed to supervise brokers with a view to preventing and detecting their securities-law violations.  The SEC’s order against Noto found that he failed to supervise two brokers and its order against Eisenberg finds that he failed to supervise one broker.

Alexander Capital agreed to be censured and pay $193,775 of allegedly ill-gotten gains, $23,437 in interest, and a $193,775 penalty, which will be placed in a Fair Fund to be returned to harmed retail customers.  Alexander Capital also agreed to hire an independent consultant to review its policies and procedures and the systems to implement them.  Noto agreed to a permanent supervisory bar and to pay a $20,000 penalty and Eisenberg agreed to a five-year supervisory bar and to pay a $15,000 penalty.  These penalties will be paid to harmed retail customers.  Alexander Capital, Noto and Eisenberg agreed to settle today’s charges without admitting or denying the findings in the SEC’s orders. If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of Alexander Capital L.P.’s misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A., 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone:  954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

Newport Coast Securities, Inc. expelled as FINRA member.

On June 22, 2018 Newport Coast Securities appealed a National Adjudicatory Council decision to the Securities and Exchange Commission.  The firm was expelled from FINRA membership, fined $403,000 and ordered to pay $853,617.04, plus prejudgment interest, jointly and severally, in restitution to customers.   Representatives Andre Vincent La Barbera and Douglas Anthony Leone were barred from association with any FINRA member in all capacities and ordered to pay full restitution to their customers.  The sanctions were based on the findings that the firm, La Barbera and Leone excessively traded customers’ accounts.  Specifically, the investigation found that La Barbera and Leone exercised de facto control of customers’ accounts and the firm is liable for the excessive trading and churning of its representatives.  FINRA found that the firm ignored multiple red flags indicating that these representatives were excessively trading and churning certain customers’ accounts.  FINRA noted that these representatives’ clients appeared repeatedly on the firm’s exception reports reflecting the high volume of trading, commission charges, or both.   As a result of their conduct, the firm, La Barbera and Leone violated Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5, NASD Rule 2120 and FINRA Rule 2020.  The firm’s expulsion is in effect pending review.  On June 25, 2018 the NAC decision became final with respect to La Barbera and Leone.

It was unclear from FINRA’s announcement whether customers had initiated FINRA arbitrations or any other type of securities arbitrations.  If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A. 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone: 954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

SEC Charges Morgan Stanley in Connection With Failure to Detect or Prevent Misappropriation of Client Funds

On June 29, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced that Morgan Stanley Smith Barney (MSSB) had agreed to pay a $3.6 million penalty and to accept certain undertakings for its failure to protect against its personnel misusing or misappropriating funds from client accounts.

The SEC’s order found that MSSB failed to have reasonably designed policies and procedures in place to prevent its advisory representatives from misusing or misappropriating funds from client accounts.  The order further found that although MSSB’s policies provided for certain reviews of disbursement requests, the reviews were not reasonably designed to detect or prevent such potential misconduct.

According to the SEC’s order, MSSB’s insufficient policies and procedures contributed to its failure to detect or prevent one of its advisory representatives, Barry F. Connell, from misusing or misappropriating approximately $7 million out of four advisory clients’ accounts in approximately 110 unauthorized transactions occurring over a period of nearly a year.

Without admitting or denying the findings, MSSB consented to the SEC’s order, which includes a $3.6 million penalty, a censure, a cease-and-desist order, and undertakings related to the firm’s policies and procedures.  Morgan Stanley previously repaid the four advisory clients in full plus interest. If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of Barry Connell’s misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A., 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone:  954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

FINRA Announces Initiative to Transform CRD, Other Registration Systems

On June 14, 2018,FINRA announced details of a multi-phased effort to overhaul its registration and disclosure programs, including the Central Registration Depository (CRD)—the central licensing and registration system that FINRA operates for the U.S. securities industry and its regulators and that provides the backbone of BrokerCheck. The first phase of the transformation—a new WebCRD interface that highlights important information or activities requiring immediate attention of firms, branches and individuals—goes into effect June 30.

The transformation aims to increase the utility and efficiency of the registration and disclosure process for firms, investors and regulators, as well as to reduce compliance costs for firms. FINRA’s Board of Governors has approved moving forward with the project, which FINRA expects to complete in 2021.

FINRA developed and operates several systems that support registration and disclosure requirements for the securities industry, and works closely with the SEC and NASAA on policy and program requirements for the systems. Securities firms use these systems to register and maintain the records of associated persons who operate within the securities industry, and investors use them—through BrokerCheck—to research the professional backgrounds of brokers and brokerage firms. These registration systems are essential to the operation of the securities industry, and experience consistently high usage volume.

The redeveloped registration systems will facilitate more efficient interaction for users and leverage information from other FINRA regulatory programs, resulting in a more accurate and complete set of information about registered individuals, branches and firms—enhancing firm compliance programs and reducing compliance costs. The transformation also allows FINRA to leverage the information security benefits of cloud-based technology, and architect systems that address dangers associated with current and anticipated cyber threats and risks.

The changes are being made in response to feedback FINRA has received through various channels during its ongoing organizational improvement initiative—FINRA360—including via recommendations from firms in response to FINRA’s 2017 Special Notice on Engagement. FINRA is working closely with member firms throughout the multi-year project, and will continue to solicit their input and feedback to ensure the enhanced systems are meeting the industry’s needs.

 

General Securities Representative Bradley Everett Gardner barred from FINRA

On June 4, 2018, Bradley E. Gardner accepted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent in which he acknowledged that he was barred from association with any FINRA member in any capacity.   According to FINRA, on June 2, 2017, Gardner accepted a personal check in the amount of $7,400 from one of his elderly customers.  He allegedly told his client that she could pre-pay the fees associated with her advisory Firm accounts at a discount by writing a check payable to him, and that he would then “turn off” the fees associated with her accounts until March 2019.    He then deposited the check into his personal bank account and used the funds to pay for his personal expenses.  In the meantime, the firm continued to charge the client the fees associated with her advisory Firm accounts.  Mr. Gardner’s misconduct was discovered in September 2017, at which time Mr. Gardner reimbursed the whole amount to his client.

By converting customer funds, Garner violated FINRA rules.   Conversion is the intentional and unauthorized taking of an/or exercise of ownership over property by one who neither owns the property nor is entitled to possess it.

If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A. 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone: 954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

SEC Charges Long Island Investment Professional in $8 Million Scam Targeting Long-Standing Brokerage Customers

On May 30, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission charged a former registered representative with defrauding long-standing brokerage customers in an $8 million investment scam.

According to the SEC’s complaint, Steven Pagartanis, who was affiliated with a registered broker-dealer, told some investors – including retirees who had been Pagartanis’s customers for many years – that he would invest their funds in either a publicly-traded or private land development company.  He promised that the funds would be safe and also promised guaranteed monthly interest payments on the investments.  At Pagartanis’s direction, his investors wrote checks payable to a similarly-named entity that was secretly controlled by Pagartanis.  In all, the customers invested approximately $8 million, which Pagartanis used to pay personal expenses and make the guaranteed “interest” payments to his customers.  To conceal the scam, which unraveled earlier this year when Pagartanis stopped making the so-called interest payments to customers, Pagartanis created fictitious account statements reflecting ownership interests in the land development companies.

The Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office filed criminal charges on May 30, 2018 against Pagartanis.

The SEC’s complaint, filed in federal district court in Brooklyn, charged Pagartanis with violating the antifraud provisions of the federal securities laws.  The SEC is seeking a judgment ordering Pagartanis to disgorge his allegedly ill-gotten gains plus prejudgment interest, and to pay financial penalties. If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of Steven Pagartanis’ misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A., 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone:  954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

93.7577 or 800.718.1422.

FINRA Sanctions Fifth Third Securities, Inc., $6 Million for Cost and Fee Disclosure Failures and Unsuitable Recommendations Related to Variable Annuity Exchanges

On May 8, 2018, FINRA announced that it had fined Fifth Third Securities, Inc., $4 million and required the firm to pay approximately $2 million in restitution to customers for failing to appropriately consider and accurately describe the costs and benefits of variable annuity (VA) exchanges, and for recommending exchanges without a reasonable basis to believe the exchanges were suitable. This is the second significant FINRA enforcement action against Fifth Third involving the firm’s sale of variable annuities.

Variable annuities are complex investments commonly marketed and sold to retirees or people saving for retirement. Exchanging one VA with another involves a comparison of the complex features of each security. Accordingly, VA exchanges are subject to regulatory requirements to ensure that brokers have a reasonable basis to recommend them, and their supervisors have a reasonable basis to approve the sales.

FINRA found that Fifth Third failed to ensure that its registered representatives obtained and assessed accurate information concerning the recommended VA exchanges. It also found that the firm’s registered representatives and principals were not adequately trained on how to conduct a comparative analysis of the material features of the VAs. As a result, the firm misstated the costs and benefits of exchanges, making the exchange appear more beneficial to the customer. By reviewing a sample of VA exchanges that the firm approved from 2013 through 2015, FINRA found that Fifth Third misstated or omitted at least one material fact relating to the costs or benefits of the VA exchange in approximately 77 percent of the samples.  For example:

  • Fifth Third overstated the total fees of the existing VA or misstated fees associated with various additional optional benefits, known as riders.
  • Fifth Third failed to disclose that the existing VA had an accrued living benefit value, or understated the living benefit value, which the customer would forfeit upon executing the proposed exchange.
  • Fifth Third represented that a proposed VA had a living benefit rider even though the proposed VA did not, in fact, include a living benefit rider.

FINRA found that the firm’s principals ultimately approved approximately 92 percent of VA exchange applications submitted to them for review. However, in light of the firm’s supervisory deficiencies, the firm did not have a reasonable basis to recommend and approve many of these transactions.

In addition, FINRA found that Fifth Third failed to comply with the terms of its 2009 settlement with FINRA. In the 2009 action, FINRA found that, from 2004 to 2006, Fifth Third effected 250 unsuitable VA exchanges and transactions and had inadequate systems and procedures governing its VA exchange business. For more than four years following the settlement, the firm failed to fully implement an independent consultant’s recommendation that it develop certain surveillance procedures to monitor VA exchanges by individual registered representatives.

In settling this matter, Fifth Third neither admitted nor denied the charges, but consented to the entry of FINRA’s findings. If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of Fifth Third Securities Inc.’s misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A., 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone:  954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.

SEC Shuts Down $85 Million Ponzi Scheme and Obtains Asset Freeze

On May 1, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced the unsealing of fraud charges against a Mississippi company and its principal who allegedly bilked at least 150 investors in an $85 million Ponzi scheme.  The defendants agreed to permanent injunctions, an asset freeze, and expedited discovery.

The SEC’s complaint alleges that Arthur Lamar Adams lied to investors by telling them that their money would be used by his company, Madison Timber Properties, LLC, to secure and harvest timber from various land owners located in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi, and promised annual returns of 12-15%.  But Madison Timber never obtained any harvesting rights.  Instead, Adams allegedly forged deeds and cutting agreements as well as documents purportedly reflecting the value of the timber on the land.  Adams also allegedly paid early investors with later investors’ funds and convinced investors to roll over their investments.  According to the complaint, Adams used investors’ money for personal expenses and to develop an unrelated real estate project.

The SEC’s complaint, filed under seal in federal court in Jackson, Mississippi on April 20, 2018, charges Adams and Madison Timber Properties with violating the antifraud provisions of the federal securities laws.  The court granted the SEC’s request for an asset freeze and permanently enjoined Madison Timber and Adams from violating the antifraud provisions of the federal securities laws and ordered Adams to surrender his passport.  Adams and Madison Timber consented to the entry of the court order.

 

FINRA Disciplinary Action against Cambridge Investment Research, Inc.

On April 11, 2018, FINRA issued a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent in which Cambridge Investment Research, Inc. (Cambridge) was censured and fined $150,000.  Without admitting or denying the findings, the firm consented to the sanctions and to the entry of findings that it failed to establish, maintain and enforce a supervisory system and written supervisory procedures designed to supervise representatives’ sales of leveraged, inverse-leveraged exchange-traded funds (Non-Traditional ETF’s) and the redemption of variable annuities.

During the relevant period, January 2014 to March 2016, Cambridge’s customers, redeemed variable annuities and transferred the proceeds to an advisory account, on about 100 occasions.  It was found that the firm’s associated persons were involved with and recommended some of those transactions.    Additionally, from June 2012 to June 2015, eighty-four Cambridge registered representatives traded 4,773 transactions involving Non-Traditional ETFs in retail customers accounts, totaling about $127 million.  Cambridge failed to enforce its procedures and adequately monitor its representatives.

If you believe that you have suffered losses as a result of misconduct, you may contact David A. Weintraub, P.A. 7805 SW 6th Court, Plantation, FL 33324.  By phone: 954.693.7577 or 800.718.1422.